Hello de Ferrers – Hello World!

Welcome to the de Ferrers Science Blog.

On here Mr Griffiths along with other Science staff and students will add info, links, videos, pictures, etc. to extend your learning, from basics such as revision help to showing real Science outside the Lab.

You can keep up to date with new science stories by subscribing or following the blog’s Twitter feed @mr_g_defsci.

Mr G

The 9 BEST Study Tips (backed up with Science)

Welcome back to another academic year.

Our friends over at ASAPScience have a new video – with the BEST ways to plan and manage your studying. Take a look…

Mr G

Sources – ASAPScience YouTube


Don’t try this at Home – Reactivity Series of Alkali Metals

If you can cope with the cheesy dance music – this is an eye-opener.

Certainly goes beyond what H&S will let us do in the classroom – but if it can impress my Year 8, I figured it would impress everyone else.


Mr G

Source: YouTube

Is this the year of Space Science?

First there was Rosetta – catching up with comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Landing the Philae probe onto the surface in November 2014.

Philae, unfortunately landed in too much shadow (after a few bounces). But woke up again on 13th of June having received enough sunlight, just days before Dr Monica Grady (big sister of our “head of maths”) came to give a talk to de Ferrers students.

140912_Philae_s_backup_landing_site_from_30_km_b Rosetta_comet_land_3105124k Rosetta_Philae_Artist_Impression_Poster_625x815

This week has seen New Horizons reach Pluto, after a 9 year journey around the solar system

We now have clear images of Pluto’s surface and pictures of Pluto’s moons, such as Charon.


Other important space science events include:

It’s a very exciting time to be an Astrophysicist!

Mr G

Source: NASA (New Horizons), Wikipedia, HubbleSite

What was the Big Bang?

Hello again world.

It’s been a long time since we last blogged. Hopefully that will change – I will be recruiting more student bloggers in September. In the mean time I hope to be blogging more resources.

This YouTube video – part of Kurz Gesagt’s excellent “In a Nutshell” series of science videos.


Mr G

Sources: YouTube – Kurz Gesagt – In a Nutshell

Where is the pink in the rainbow?

The song “I can sing a rainbow” – the cause of many incorrect answers in a Physics lesson – has pink.

We can clearly see pink things so there must be pink light…

If you look at the rainbow/spectrum of visible light there is no pink.

This quick Minute Physics video explains why.

Mr G

Source: YouTube – Minute Physics

P1 Revision – Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

A quick video clip covering the origin and meaning of the Cosmic (Microwave) Background Radiation

Minute Physics have many more very useful clips… Go have a look-see…

Mr G

Source: YouTube – Minute Physics

GCSE Revision Videos – myGCSEscience



As recommended by my Year 11 GCSE Physics students – myGCSEscience.com is an excellent site that has video clips on all areas of GCSE science, sorted into modules for the AQA Core Science (B1 C1 P1), Additional Science  (B2 C2 P2) and Separate Sciences (B3 C3 P3).

Here is an example from P3 on Convex Lenses

Each video comes with a pdf you can print, with pictures of the slides and spaces for your  own notes – so you can build up your own revision guide.

Plus – since all videos are hosted by YouTube – you can use your mobile or tablet to watch them.

Mr G

Sources – myGCSEscience.com, YouTube



P2 Chapter 7 Revision – The Life Cycle of Stars

Here is a clip on the Life Cycle of Stars put together by the Institute of Physics

Mr G


P2 Chapter 7 Revision – Black Holes

Another BBC YouTube clip from Wonders of the Universe – which covers GCSE Physics 2!! – This time on Black Holes.

Mr G

P2 Chapter 7 Revision – Where do the elements come from?

Professor Brian Cox – teaching you GCSE Physics 2…

The Big Bang made hydrogen – but where did the other 91 natural chemical elements come from? These clips from the BBC’s Wonders of the Universe by Brian Cox answer the questions…

How do we know there are only 92 elements – even out in deep space?

All atoms give out only certain colours – a spectrum – based on how their electrons behave. They also absorb only those colours too. You might have seen this by doing flame tests or looking at gas discharge tubes using a spectroscope.

How did all these elements get made?

Every element in nature was made in stars, during their “life and death” by a process of nuclear fusion which gives out energy up to Iron (so these are made as stars live and die) but needs energy for heavier elements (which means these are made when a star explodes)

Not little stars like ours – but HUGE stars!!

Mr G

Sources: BBC Wonders of the Universe